The 20 Greatest HBO Series of All Time (Part 2)

Posted 2017/07/27 2225 0

Game of Thrones only ranks 19th on the list, so it seems like there are so many other great shows for you to check out!

 

10. Deadwood

"Deadwood" is set in a mining town that was not part of any U.S. state or territory in the post-Civil War years, and thus was literally lawless. Deadwood attracts people looking to get rich after a huge gold strike, as well as those looking to capitalize on the lack of organized law in the town, built on land stolen from the Sioux.

 

9. Curb Your Enthusiasm

"Seinfeld" co-creator Larry David plays a version of himself on the improvised series. He faces a constant barrage of life's little annoyances, which in David's sometimes well-meaning but terminally fumbling hands don't tend to stay small for very long.

 

8. Angels in America

Playwright Tony Kushner adapts his political epic about the AIDS crisis during the mid-eighties, around a group of separate but connected individuals.

 

7. Sex and the City

Four years after the earlier adventures of Carrie Bradshaw (Sarah Jessica Parker) and her best gal pals, she and her intermittent lover, Big (Chris Noth), are in a committed relationship. Samantha (Kim Cattrall), having survived cancer, has a monogamous relationship with Smith Jerrod. Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and her husband live on Park Avenue, and Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), now in Brooklyn, feels the pressure of family life.

 

6. Veep

"Politics is about people," former Sen. Selina Meyer is fond of saying. Unfortunately, the people Meyer, a charismatic leader and rising star in her party, meets after becoming vice president are nothing like she expected, but everything she was warned about. "Veep" follows the new VP as she puts out political fires, juggles her public schedule and private life, and does everything within her limited powers to improve her dysfunctional relationship with the chief executive. Meyer's trusted, and some not-so-trusted, aides include chief of staff Amy, spokesperson Mike, secretary Sue and right-hand man Gary.

 

5. The Leftovers

In a global cataclysm, "The Sudden Departure," 140 million people disappeared without a trace. Three years later, residents of Mapleton, N.Y., try to maintain equilibrium when the notion of "normal" no longer applies. Intense grief has divided families and turned faith to cynicism, paranoia and madness, leading some of the traumatized to join the Guilty Remnant, a cultlike group. Kevin Garvey, a beleaguered police chief, must keep peace between townspeople and the cult, a task made tougher with concern about his kids. His daughter alternates between apathy and rebellion, and his wayward son befriends a charismatic prophet. "The Leftovers" is based on the best-seller by Tom Perrotta, who is one of the series' executive producers.

 

4. Band of Brothers

This series, originally broadcast on HBO, tells the story of Easy Company, 506th Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, U.S. Army. Based on interviews with survivors of Easy Company, as well as soldiers' journals and letters, this 10-part series chronicles the experiences of these young men who knew extraordinary bravery and extraordinary fear. Based on the book written by Stephen Ambrose.

 

3. The Larry Sanders Show

Hey now! This series offers a behind-the-scenes look at late-night talk show host Larry Sanders (Garry Shandling) and the production of his show. Rip Torn plays the show's producer, Artie, and Jeffrey Tambor is Sanders' sidekick, Hank. Many episodes features a celebrity playing him or herself.

 

2. The Sopranos

Tony Soprano juggles the problems of his fractious family with those of a "Family" of a different sort, the mob. He sees a therapist to deal with his professional and personal problems, which bring on panic attacks. He deals with personal and professional power struggles, affairs, violence, the threat of exposure and betrayal, and a whole bunch of people being whacked.

 

1. The Wire

This series looks at the narcotics scene in Baltimore through the eyes of law enforcers as well as the drug dealers and users. Other facets of the city that are explored in the series are the government and bureaucracy, schools and the news media. The show was created by former police reporter David Simon, who also wrote many of the episodes.

 

 

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